Intestinal Parasitic Infections among Prison Inmates in Kathmandu Nepal

  • Prasha Shrestha Department of Microbiology, Shi-Gan International College of Science and Technology (SICOST), Kathmandu, Nepal
  • Dhiraj Shrestha Department of Microbiology, Shi-Gan International College of Science and Technology (SICOST), Kathmandu, Nepal
  • Dhiraj Thapa Magar Department of Microbiology, Shi-Gan International College of Science and Technology (SICOST), Kathmandu, Nepal
  • Ganesh Rai Department of Microbiology, Shi-Gan International College of Science and Technology (SICOST), Kathmandu, Nepal
  • Kul Raj Rai Department of Microbiology, Shi-Gan International College of Science and Technology (SICOST), Kathmandu, Nepal
  • Shiba Kumar Rai Department of Microbiology, Shi-Gan International College of Science and Technology (SICOST), Kathmandu, Nepal

Abstract

Background: Prison inmates are at high risk of intestinal parasitic infections. Thus, we studied intestinal parasitic infections among inmates of the Central Jail, Kathmandu, Nepal.
Methods: Morning stool samples from 400 inmates (M=282 and F=118), were collected in a clean, dry and wide-mouthed plastic container. The samples were transported to the research laboratory of Shi-Gan International College of Science and Technology, and were fixed using 10% formal saline. Then, samples were processed by formal ether sedimentation concentration technique and were observed microscopically by direct-smear technique.
Results: Six percent (24/400) samples were positive for intestinal parasites, with a gender ratio (M:F) 1.7:1. But, co-parasitism was not observed. Intestinal parasitic infections were higher among 21-40 years age-group, 3.5% (14/262). Similarly, intestinal parasitic infections were higher among ‘Dalits’ ethnic group, 21.1% (4/19). As compared to helminths, more protozoans, 62.5% (15/24), were observed. Giardia lamblia, 41.67% (10/24), was the most common protozoans while Trichuris trichiura, 25.0% (6/24), was the most common helminths.
Conclusions: Intestinal parasitic infections were lower among the inmates of Central jail, but such conditions cannot be presumed in other peripheral settings. Pure and safe drinking water supply and the effective deworming campaign can further reduce this figure at this setting and peripheral jails across the country.
Keywords: Intestinal parasitic infections; IPIs; Nepal; prison inmates.

Published
2019-11-14
How to Cite
SHRESTHA, Prasha et al. Intestinal Parasitic Infections among Prison Inmates in Kathmandu Nepal. Journal of Nepal Health Research Council, [S.l.], v. 17, n. 3, p. 382-387, nov. 2019. ISSN 1999-6217. Available at: <http://jnhrc.com.np/index.php/jnhrc/article/view/2015>. Date accessed: 08 dec. 2019. doi: https://doi.org/10.33314/jnhrc.v17i3.2015.